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MiracleFeet, Co-Founded by Dr. Hyman, Featured in New York Times

July 19, 2017

Columbia Orthopedics Pediatric Orthopedic Surgeon, Joshua Hyman, MD’s foundation MiracleFeet, a nongovernmental organization focused on the treatment of children with clubfeet in low-resourced countries, was featured in a New York Times article. Dr. Hyman is a founding board member and serves as the chair of the medical advisory committee for the organization.

The NY Times article, written by Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Nicholas Kristof, praised MiracleFeet for the high quality of its work combined with the low-cost of its implementation.

“I wish that skeptics of humanitarian aid could have seen the baby get care from MiracleFeet and emerge with feet as good as anyone else’s. Now she’ll be able to walk and run, go to school and hold a job, support herself and her country.”

Dr. Hyman was happy to see his organization featured in The NY Times and believes the exposure can help spread the word about the disability caused by clubfoot and the global efforts underway to treat it.

“I was pleased to see people recognize the work and accomplishments of MiracleFeet. It’s also important for people in the U.S. to understand the impact of club foot on children worldwide,” said Dr. Hyman. “In the U.S., nearly all children receive proper and successful treatment for their clubfeet. Regrettably, this is not the case in low and middle-income countries. The World Health Organization has publicly recognized that club foot is a major determinant of poverty. A child with a club foot in a developing country may not get to go to school. They might be shunned by their family. Their family might be shunned by their community. It becomes sort of a snowball effect and it can become devastating for a large group of people. With a minimal amount of effort, not very significant technological equipment or expertise, these children’s feet can be treated relatively inexpensively and forever. It will make a lifelong impact on the individual, their family, and their community.”

About MiracleFeet

MiracleFeet provides organizational, technical, and financial support to clinics to increase access to treatment for children born with clubfoot in developing countries. The treatment costs, on average, only $250 per child. Miraclefeet supports local practitioners who are trained in the Ponseti method, a non-surgical treatment that involves a series of plaster casts. Following casting, a foot brace is worn at night for several years in order to prevent relapse. Using a bottom-up approach, MiracleFeet offers a continuous cycle of support for the treatment of children. By 2019, over 50,000 children will have been positively impacted by MiracleFeet.

MiracleFeet goes beyond fixing feet. Proper treatment has far-reaching benefits – reducing the chances of living a life of poverty, abuse, and neglect in a vulnerable group of children who can easily be identified and helped. MiracleFeet is helping them rewrite their story and transform their lives.

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